AKC Maximus Ray

About Us

Were just two dog lovers who have always owned Bullmastiffs. Maximus and Myah are two family dogs that run and play everyday with the whole family. They love to play with my brothers dogs and any other dogs they meet. Very kind and loving dogs. Thats why we love this breed.


 

Bullmastiff

The Bullmastiff is a large-sized breed of domestic dog, with a solid build and a short muzzle. The Bullmastiff shares the characteristics of molosser dogs, and was originally developed by 19th-century gamekeepers to guard estates. The breed's bloodlines are drawn from the English Mastiff and the extinct Old English Bulldog. It was recognized as a purebred dog by the English Kennel Club in 1924. They are quiet dogs and very rarely bark.


 

Size

Males should stand 25-27 inches (64-69 cm) tall (American Kennel Club (AKC) standard) at the withers and weigh110-130 pounds (50-59 kg). Females should be 24-26 inches (61-66 cm) at the withers, and 90-120 pounds (41-54 kg). Exceeding these dimensions is discouraged by breeders.


 

Color

A Bullmastiff's coat may appear in fawn, red, or brindle. These are the only acceptable colors in the AKC standard. The fawn can range from a very light brown to a reddish brown. Red can range from a light red-fawn to a dark, rich red. Brindles are a striped overlay of the fawn or red. A Bullmastiff should have no white markings, except for on the chest where a little white is allowed.

Bullmastiff History

Bred by English gamekeepers in the 19th century to assist English wardens or gamekeepers guard estates and capture poachers. As a result, the Bullmastiff is known as the Gamekeeper's Night Dog. The preferred color, by gamekeepers, was brindle, as this color works as a more effective camouflage, especially at night. The Bullmastiff was a cross of 40% Old English Bulldog (not the short, chubby Bulldog of today) and 60% English Mastiff for its size, strength, and loyalty. They bark much less often than other breeds; however, they do bark on alarm.

The Bullmastiff was recognized as a pure-bred dog in 1924 by the English Kennel Club. In 1934, the AKC recognized the Bullmastiff. The first standard for the breed was approved in 1935. The standard has undergone several revisions since then; the most current version is available on the AKC website.


 

Trainability

Bullmastiffs are strong, powerful, but sensitive dogs. For a Bullmastiff to become a well-behaved family member, consistency is needed. Training and socialization is of high importance, as the breed can be independent. Dogs of this breed are natural guardians of their home and owners. No special guard training is needed for a Bullmastiff to react appropriately if its family is endangered. During training, a Bullmastiff requires a special approach, because these dogs do not like to repeat the same actions again and again. Activities Bullmastiffs enjoy include obedience, agility, tracking, and carting.